Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Talk about music gear for noise music

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Moonchild
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Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by Moonchild » Wed Jun 07, 2017 4:46 pm

Things to buy:
  • At least 3 6.3mm cables, around 30$
  • 1 Xenyx Q802USB Mixer around 80$
  • 1 Boss Tera Echo, around 150$
  • 1 One Spot Power Supply, around 30$
  • 1 Boss FV-500L Foot Volume, around 100$
  • Sennheiser HD280PRO Headphone, around 100$
Optional:
  • 1 Shure SM57 or SM 58 for vocals and feedback, around 100$
  • 1 contact mic, around 5$
  • 1 bent piece of metal, around 20$
Total:
About 500$ with the ability to add the optional components later.

I put an expensive headphone and vocal microphone in the list because I really think good sound quality is the key in finding pleasure using this build. But if you don't think so, feel free to get cheaper ones as long as the headphone is loud enough to create feedback with a relatively close microphone. Alternatively, you could use a guitar amp, but it isn't very neighbour-friendly, and to have a similar sound quality you'd have to pay much more. But it's totally fine if you already have one.

Instructions:

Put the Volume knobs and Aux Knobs (the red ones) on your mixer to -∞, plug one end of one of your cable to the aux output of your mixer, and the other end into the first input of your Volume Pedal. Plug one end of your second cable in the first output of your Volume Pedal and the other end into the input of the Tera Echo. On the pedal, put the FX lvl and Tone knobs on max, and the Feedback and Time Knobs to minimum. Put one end of your last cable into the output of the Boss pedal and the other to the 4th channel input of your mixer (you could have stereo by using 2 cables instead of one, it change the sound but not by much, it just triggers the ping-pong effect of the Tera Echo). It is what engineer call a feedback loop. But it is not yet activated (it doesn't produce sound).

Thus far: Aux Output of the mixer > Volume pedal > Tera Echo > 4th channel of the mixer

Now plug in the Headphone in the "Phones" input of your mixer (or a cable from the first "control room output" into your amp and put it on). Make sure the volume knob of your FV-500L is put to minimum to obtain silence when the pedal is down. Now press the pedal so we will hear a sound during the following steps. Now make the following change to the EQ knobs of the channel your Tera Echo was plugged in. Highs are maxed, Medium are maxed, Low Are at 12 o'clock position. Now put the volume knob of your 4th channel to +15db, so it's maxed, put the master volume (labeled "Main Mix") around 8-9 o'clock, put the Aux knob of your 4th channel at 0db (around 12 o'clock) and rise the "Phones Control Room" from minimum to 7 o'clock and you will hear the sound of the feedback loop fading in. Adjust the volume to your taste. But be careful of your ears. A little loud is fine as long as you just play from time to time. The more you play the quieter you must be. So if you intend to play every day, try to be slightly quieter than your taste dictates. You'll also be more objective about the quality of the noises you produce that way.

Now put one foot on the volume pedal, your left hand on the Aux knob of your 4th channel, and your right hand on the "time" knob of your Tera Echo: this is the position you'll be working with. Try to play only with your foot first, just to trigger the sound. Then turn the "time" knob your Tera Echo to the right as you end the sound to create a trail, and turn it back to minimum to end it. Then, oscillate the "aux" knob of your 4th channel between minimum value (silence) and maximum. Then, try to put the "aux" knob in the middle position and move the Low EQ knob of your fourth channel. You can oscillate between minimum value and about 2 o'clock where the sound start to transform in some kind of clicks. Finally. try to play everything together, using your left hand to either control the Low knob or the "aux" knob. Be patient at first and try to focus your attention on one element at a time and try every elements. The first thing you gotta learn is to control the volume pedal without thinking about it too hard, then focus on the Tera Echo, and only then try to mess around with your left hand. If you find it too hard, contact me at adrien.hirsbrunner -at- gmail.com, I can give you some advice or even skype lessons if you want (at least I can try).

Here is an example of what you can do with this set-up: https://moonchildswitzerland.bandcamp.com/releases

If you want to record, you can use the free program Audacity. Plug your USB cable in your PC, open Audacity, choose your mixer as the line in and your ready to record.

You can infuse the feedback loop by using direct lines, such as microphones. Just plug them in with the channel volume to minimum then put the volume and aux knobs to max, and adjust the "gain" knob to hear it in your sound. For vocal mics, just make sound with your mouth as you raise the volume pedal. Beatbox can help a lot, as it use a lot of noises. One useful tip, is to use to expirate the sound "hhhh" a little bit like the sound of a cat who wants to be left alone, or the sound "shhhh" or "khhhh" and the modulate it with different vowels

For contact mics, first tape it to your piece of metal and place it on the ground to play it with your remaining foot. I then recommand plugging in it into the second input of your volume pedal, then use another cable to connect the second output of your volume pedal to one of the first two channel of your mixer (the one with the "gain" knobs), and proceed normally with the gain. That way you will only hear the contact mic when you press your volume pedal and trigger the feedback loop. You can even add effects such as distortions or fuzz to your contact mic (put them before the volume pedal in your chain to obtain silence, or after if you like their hum). You still have one channel to do what you want (synth, drum machine, sampler, you name it). And note that if you have a vocal microphone plugged in, the "aux" knob of your 4th channel will no longer produce silence as it's down to -∞ but a classic microphone feedback sound that you can modulate by moving either the microphone or the amplifier (aka the Headphone, using your head). The same goes for contact mic except you cannot modulate the feedback.

If your a beginner I hope everything is clear and useful and don't forget there are many ways to play noise and this is just one way. If your already experienced forgive me being so tedious, this is mainly intended for neophytes, but please share this to newcomers around you who don't know where to start, or even try it for yourself if you're curious. Don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.

May you find the ultimate joy of noise!

Peace
Last edited by Moonchild on Tue Jun 13, 2017 11:10 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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xdugef
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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by xdugef » Wed Jun 07, 2017 5:44 pm

I dunno that looks like an intermediate process to Cut-Up Noise

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diurnalburdens
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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by diurnalburdens » Thu Jun 08, 2017 3:36 am

I've always assumed cut-up noise referred to a micro editing process, making it similar to musique concrete. Cutting up recordings and re-arranging, like John Wiese, Evil Moisture etc...

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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by Claud601 » Thu Jun 08, 2017 4:22 am

diurnalburdens wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 3:36 am
I've always assumed cut-up noise referred to a micro editing process, making it similar to musique concrete. Cutting up recordings and re-arranging, like John Wiese, Evil Moisture etc...
It is I'm not sure wtf op is talking about

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Misomusist
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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by Misomusist » Thu Jun 08, 2017 4:55 am

I was just thinking the prices were a bit high, haven't they heard of craigslist. :mrgreen:
I think trying to quantify music is one of the biggest wastes of time in the world, like discussing your favourite colour or deity or pizza topping. People should realise that and get on with their life.

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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by timdrage » Thu Jun 08, 2017 4:57 am

> 1 bent piece of metal, around 20$

u are doing it very very wrong

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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by xdugef » Thu Jun 08, 2017 6:22 am

diurnalburdens wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 3:36 am
I've always assumed cut-up noise referred to a micro editing process, making it similar to musique concrete. Cutting up recordings and re-arranging, like John Wiese, Evil Moisture etc...
Well it does but you can do those things in realtime by switching between sources rapidly or using a sampling digital or some other method (Wiese uses Max / Bolus has used a DIY audio chopper that mangles incoming signals) and inserting short bits of audio into the loop. But imo cutup noise can also refer to jarring noise that switches between silence and short bursts of noise that you might get with noise gate and or rattle box and a contact mic.

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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by Moonchild » Thu Jun 08, 2017 6:41 am

timdrage wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 4:57 am
> 1 bent piece of metal, around 20$

u are doing it very very wrong
That's the price I paid in Switzerland. Hopefully it's cheaper elsewhere.

And yeah, this build is to play live, but if want to mess with recordings you need a lot more pedal. This is just a thing to get you started.

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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by crochambeau » Thu Jun 08, 2017 8:05 am

Hello Moonchild, welcome to the board!
timdrage wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 4:57 am
> 1 bent piece of metal, around 20$

u are doing it very very wrong
I was going to jokingly offer to sell some bent metal for only $19.50, thanks for blowing my chance Tim. :hic:

Seriously though, in regards of metal - look up sheet metal fabricators. They take raw sheet and bend it into useful shapes for other industries. There will always be waste in this process, so contacting them to see if you can root around in their recycle bin is worth the effort. I generally pay them scrap rate (40-50 cents per pound) for the access. Some companies will probably turn you down for liability sake because metal can cut the ever loving shit out of you.
I have no suggestion for software.
http://www.rochambeau.net/

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Moonchild
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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by Moonchild » Thu Jun 08, 2017 8:15 am

Thanks! That's a good advice! Noted.

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diurnalburdens
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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by diurnalburdens » Thu Jun 08, 2017 11:47 am

xdugef wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 6:22 am
diurnalburdens wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 3:36 am
I've always assumed cut-up noise referred to a micro editing process, making it similar to musique concrete. Cutting up recordings and re-arranging, like John Wiese, Evil Moisture etc...
Well it does but you can do those things in realtime by switching between sources rapidly or using a sampling digital or some other method (Wiese uses Max / Bolus has used a DIY audio chopper that mangles incoming signals) and inserting short bits of audio into the loop. But imo cutup noise can also refer to jarring noise that switches between silence and short bursts of noise that you might get with noise gate and or rattle box and a contact mic.
Makes sense, yeah. I guess I've not really come across all the sub genres and whatnot.

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Misomusist
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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by Misomusist » Thu Jun 08, 2017 3:13 pm

Moonchild wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 6:41 am
And yeah, this build is to play live, but if want to mess with recordings you need a lot more pedal. This is just a thing to get you started.
There's this program, it's called Audacity, and you can get it free :mrgreen:
I think trying to quantify music is one of the biggest wastes of time in the world, like discussing your favourite colour or deity or pizza topping. People should realise that and get on with their life.

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xdugef
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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by xdugef » Thu Jun 08, 2017 5:14 pm

Misomusist wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 3:13 pm
Moonchild wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 6:41 am
And yeah, this build is to play live, but if want to mess with recordings you need a lot more pedal. This is just a thing to get you started.
There's this program, it's called Audacity, and you can get it free :mrgreen:
Yup and run it on a used laptop for less than the cost of the gear described in the OP.

You could also use Pure Data and do it in realtime.

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Misomusist
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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by Misomusist » Thu Jun 08, 2017 6:32 pm

It would be fun to run some of the Audacity plugins in realtime on a pedal, I suppose you could do an Arduino/RPI thing, but I really hate that crap. Though there was that one thing someone posted a while back, designed for just this.


http://www.axoloti.com/product/axoloti-core/
I think trying to quantify music is one of the biggest wastes of time in the world, like discussing your favourite colour or deity or pizza topping. People should realise that and get on with their life.

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Moonchild
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Re: Cut-up Noise For Beginners

Post by Moonchild » Fri Jun 09, 2017 10:43 am

xdugef wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 5:14 pm
Misomusist wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 3:13 pm
Moonchild wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 6:41 am
And yeah, this build is to play live, but if want to mess with recordings you need a lot more pedal. This is just a thing to get you started.
There's this program, it's called Audacity, and you can get it free :mrgreen:
Yup and run it on a used laptop for less than the cost of the gear described in the OP.

You could also use Pure Data and do it in realtime.
I never said my method was the cheapest or even the best overall. It's just designed for people who wants to find the joy of toying with a real live instrument. Like a physical object you can manipulate in real time. It's very different from programmation, even with a graphic interface.

But then, it's true that I dismissed digital noise in my reasoning. And it's probably a grave mistake, thanks for pointing that out. I'm just too old-school. My bad. If you or some other people could elaborate more on the subject of digital creation I'd be really interested. :D

edit:I changed few things in my tutorial, mainly language mistakes, a tip for vocals and the very end. I hope it's more fair that way.

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